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Rose Art Museum fall season features Joe Bradley, Kevork Mourad, Tony Lewis and more

Joe Bradley, Mother and Child, 2016. Collection of Larry Gagosian.
Joe Bradley, Mother and Child, 2016. Collection of Larry Gagosian. Image courtesy of the artist.

This fall, the Rose Art Museum will feature the first large-scale museum exhibition of abstractionist Joe Bradley, new work from painter Kevork Mourad, two exhibitions of work from the Rose’s permanent collection, a video installation by award-winning British artist John Akomfrah, and a mural by Tony Lewis that examines language, memory, and race.  

The Rose will open to the public on Sept. 8, with a daytime open house for the Brandeis communityon Sept. 7. The Joe Bradley exhibition in the Lois Foster Gallery and the Tony Lewis Mural in the Foster Stairwell will open in October. Once all exhibitions are installed, an opening celebration that is free and open to the public will be held Saturday Oct. 14 from 6 to 9 p.m.  

More info on this season's exhibitions:

“Body Talk,” Gerald S. and Sandra Fineberg Gallery
These works, which span nearly a century, include the Surrealist-inspired collages and paintings of Joseph Cornell, André Masson, and Max Weber as well as contemporary sculpture, video, and multimedia works by Robert Melee, Jason Rhoades, and Laurel Nakadate. Many of the works dwell on the tension between desire and abjection. “Body Talk” is the first in a series of exhibitions to explore the origins and thematic through lines in the Rose’s permanent collection.

“Buckdancer’s Choice: Joe Bradley Selects,” Lower Rose Gallery
Eccentric figuration and geometric abstraction represent two poles in this playful mix of highlights and lesser-known gems from the Rose collection, selected by artist Joe Bradley in conjunction with his solo exhibition in the Lois Foster Gallery. Open-ended formal dialogues between artworks such as Claes Oldenburg’s “Tray Meal” and Larry Poons’s “Jazio” are suggested alongside pairings that take inspiration from generative historical relationships between artists: writer Philip Roth, represented as a sculptural bust, stands in dialogue with his friend and fellow satirist, painter Philip Guston.

Read about more of this season's exhibitions here.

Categories: Campus News
Date: September 1, 2017